<div dir="ltr"><div><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div>Dear Pedro,</div><div><br></div><div>     Thank you for your note, and I look forward to hearing more as your thoughts ripen.</div><div>To help stir your thoughts . . . re “missing agency . . . factually minimized under the form of </div><div><div>constraints and uncertainty.“ </div><div><br></div><div>    I partly to agree with you, in that agency in not an initial focus. But I also hope you see that an analysis that “ends in a phenomenology of useful information“ anticipates agency in some way. I also hope you see item 5 from the introductory text alludes heavily to agency. Still, I can see how this minimal presentation is unsatisfying . . . But, I do go into detail on agency in supplemental papers #3 and #4, and even paper #2 broaches the matter.</div><div><br></div><div>    I think part of the challenge here is that an a priori analysis does not automatically raise issues of agency, unless one thinks information arises *only* in the presence of agency. If that is the case (for you) I will have to wait to hear more from you before I say more.</div><div><br></div><div><div>> My central question: could there be any form of non-living agency?</div><div>A "society of atoms" interacting at a quantum level, producing molecular quantum puddles? </div><div>> And then, What different forms of life could receive the "agent" label?</div><div>Or how do we even define life? Action potentials? Transmitted how? All big questions . . . </div><div>> How being alive biases the non-at-all-free communication game?</div><div>Just too big now . . . I cannot even begin to speculate here.</div><div><br></div><div>These are all interesting and exciting issues . . . I look forward to hearing more!</div><div><br></div><div>Marcus</div></div></div></div></div>
</div>